A Devastating Alternate Second World War

June 19, 2009

Segment 55.4

A short segment, covering only a week. Hope you enjoy.


Segment 55.4

(made some minor typo corrections. It was a Chilean sub that was sunk, not a Argentinian one. Also, B-34's dropped the atomic bomb not the B-36 ;)

29 comments:

Anonymous said...

Great update!, short and sweet! Looking forward to the oncoming offensive in north Africa Keep up the good work!!

Anonymous said...

Awesome! Your the man Bobby!

SWFCane

Anonymous said...

Wow,you've really got a knack for leaving the reading wanting more as soon as possible.

Keep up the great work Bobby.

Anonymous said...

Oh my oh my oh my oh my!

Great little update :) Well deserved!

Anxiously awaiting new installments! wooh!

Anonymous said...

Thanks Bobby!

InB4 Ole crys about something.

Archangel said...

Very good, Bobby!:)

Bobby Hardenbrook said...

Thanks for the comments everyone!

Anonymous said...

you're an astonishingly good writer, how a writer's block becomes a hindrance is beyond me. Perfect segment!

-Matias

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

Very good update there. Even though its short its packed full of events - and the final paragraphs about Gustov's attack are damn good!

Just a couple of nitpicks

Shouldnt the B-36's mentioned being shot down be B-34's?

Also why would Chile be upset about an Argentine sub being sunk? I would think Argentina would be upset not Chile. Did you mean it to be a Chilean sub that was sunk?

Oh and by the way - whoever wrote this

Anonymous said...
Thanks Bobby!

InB4 Ole crys about something.

Next time if you are brave enough to dis me how about being brave enough to sign your name?

Bobby Hardenbrook said...

Just corrected those two typos. Couple of brain farts there ;)

Good catch

Anonymous said...

Olefin here
Just a couple of nitpicks

And so it begins lmao


Another great update Bobby, keep them coming please.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

The joining of Chile to the SAFB has just changed the strategic picture in South America greatly. The SAFB has now had several modern infantry divisions added to it, plus a couple hundred older model Sherman tanks, and a significant air and fleet presence including the only SA BB on the Pacific coast.

In addition the ability of the SAFB to produce war equipment and wage war has just been greatly increased due to the addition of the coal, iron ore, copper and nitrates of Chile, all of which they were lacking before.

With that in hand SAFB war production will definitely take off.

And with Chile as a full part of the SAFB the ODAS states in SA are now definitely outnumbered in terms of their militaries, which could cause Ecuador to possibly decide that the ODAS is not what it was cracked up to be.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

Love the anonymous attacks - at least I sign my posts. And the two issues I had are the only ones. The update was great and I cant wait for the next one. Hopefully it wont be months.

Bobby Hardenbrook said...

Regarding Chile joining the SAFB - keep in mind that Chile is still locked in a bitter and ongoing civil war. The rebels control a lot of the south and north of the country while the Junta controls the center area, the capitol, many of the major cities, etc.

Until the Junta crushes the rebels their utility to the SAFB will be fairly limited. This is why Argentina was already sending over some aircraft to help out, this could expand to ground forces as well.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

I know what you are talking about Bobby - and that also will interfere with resource allocation to the SAFB in general in areas they dont control yet in Chile.

Still I dont see the civil war lasting too long as long as it is conscript untrained foot infantry with no armor and no air support fighting tanks, trained infantry and air planes.

And I can definitely see Argentina helping out with troops - especially as they would have had a couple of divisions in border defences that could cross thru govt held areas and immediately get involved in the fighting.

Still it greatly changes the balance of forces in SA - Peru and Argentina dont have to watch their backs, they can dedicate their forces fully to Brazil and Ecuador.

And Ecuador had a very large fascist presence during OTL. I could easily see a coup attempt there now or even large scale demonstrations in support of Chile.

The attack of the US on the Chilean sub defintely would resonate in SA - it would be seen as the US using its big stick in SA yet again - and that could resonate greatly in the neutrals and Ecuador.

After all the Chilean sub wasnt attacking the US when it was sunk.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

Bobby a question - since the SAFB is at war with the AfD does that mean that Chile is now at war with the AfD? If so wouldnt they have grabbed any AfD ships in their harbors and also seen their ships in AfD controlled ports also seized by them?

Also were there any AfD bases on Chilean territory especially at Tierra Del Fuego or did they avoid any direct basing on ODAS states?

Just wondering

Bobby Hardenbrook said...

Argentina is still technically at war with Britain but there has been very little actual fighting between them for years - and niether side pulled their respective alliances into it by invoking the mutual defense clauses.
Keep in mind - there has been plenty of trade, both legal and illicit, between the SAFB and the Alliance, so both sides had an economic interest in not letting the British/Argentine spat spread.

South America has been booming on exports to all sides

Archangel said...

Sorry, Olefin, but Ecuador had a war against Perú in OTL 1941-42 (and twice more later), and have had border disputes with Perú long before that.
They would not see SAFB as a friend.
In Chile, a good portion of the mining areas are in rebel-controlled areas (north and far-south). Nitrates and Iron are in rebel-controlled areas, while Coal mines are in Junta hands. Control over Copper mines is mixed.
I add a few links to help:
www.profesorenlinea.cl/Chilegeografia/HierroChile.htm
www.codelco.com/la_corporacion/divisiones.asp

Archangel said...

I forgot to add another useful link about coal mines in Chile:
www.profesorenlinea.cl/Chilegeografia/CarbonChile.htm

I hope these links help.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

If I remember right Bobby said that the 1941 war between Peru and Ecuador didnt happen but that the Chaco War did. Thus the hard feelings between Peru and Ecuador might not exist over that particular war.

Good info on the materials of Chile - obviously the areas where the iron ore and nitrite mining operations are will be the first target of the junta and the help they will get from the Argentines.

The coal under junta control is already a big plus for the SAFB as they are hugely deficient in coal - good supplies of it mean increased power generation for them and more oil available for other uses.

Chile joining the SAFB is a real game changer - it puts almost the whole Pacific coast of South America under their control and gives them strategic depth - i.e. now there is no enemy on land on both sides of them - so they can concentrate their forces better.

Archangel said...

A few notes about the Peruvian Ecuadorian territorial conflict:
The conflict started in 1828, between the then Gran Colombia (Colombia, Ecuador, Panamá and Venezuela) and Perú. The dispute continued, including after Ecuador's independence in 1830, and included several conflicts (war of 1858-1860, among other incidents) and incidents and treaties not very well taken by the Ecuadorian side. The incidents continued up until the late 1930's and in OTL until recently.
Since the Ecuadorians have always been on the losing side over this dispute, they do not regard Perú with good eyes.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

One thing to keep in mind about Ecuador - they may join the SAFB in order to make sure Peru doesnt interfere with their country. I.e. member states of the SAFB dont invade each other or take each other's territory. If they see the SAFB as being the way to keep Ecuador safe they may join it.

Really comes down to the fact that now they are all alone on the Pacific coast with the SAFB on one side and Colombia on the other.

Anonymous said...

So is the eastern front still static? Germany I feel just needs one more great decisive victory and I don't believe it doesn't have to be Moscow that has to captured. The Germans are on the edge of forcing the soviets to quit and all they need is to push. But anyway I am a new reader I was just looking for a good alternate history and I must say this is some of the best what ifs scenario Ive read! Keep up the good work bobby!!

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

Took a look at the links you have and there is a good chance that the junta already controls at least some of the most important iron ore mines. They are in regions III and IV of Chile, and I would definitely put region IV in the central area controlled by the junta. Region III is more iffy and depends on where Bobby draws the line.

Bobby Hardenbrook said...

There is a lull on the Eastern front as the Germans bring forward their logistics tail. The lull shouldn't last much longer

Archangel said...

Regarding Chile, the rebel capital, La Serena, is in the middle of IV Coquimbo Region, only 400 kms north of Santiago, which puts most, if not all of region IV in rebel hands.

In regards to Colombia, they have been much friendlier since Ecuador ensured its independence, and the social and economic structure, even with an economic boom in SWTL, ensures a sociologic majority of AFD supporters, ranging from the Dewey-like supporters to outspoken supporters, regardless of where the simpathies of the government in place in SWTL 1949 Colombia may be (although there were some authoritarian elements in politics and military).
There was also a war between Colombia and Perú between 1932-33.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

Archangel you leave out the little fact taht Colombia may not really like the US still as they were the country that stole Panama from it - something they probably still remember. Colombia has been a neutral for quite some time now - which means that any pro-US/ODAS support is not as strong as you paint it.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here again - La Serena is in the far nothern part of region IV, not in the middle of it. The Los Pelambres copper mine, near Salamanca in Choapa is one of the largest in the world with some 2,100 million tonnes of reserves. And that mine is 80 km to the south of La Serena, and sits directly on a highway that goes to the administrative region while La Serena is a port town seperated by a lot of mountains from that area.

From that I would say that the iron ore and copper mines of Region IV (which are mostly in the southern part of the region) are probably in junta hands with the iron ore mines in Region III in rebel hands.

And I dont see the rebels lasting long either way - the only that will save the rebels is ground forces from the US and that means war with the SAFB - and clearly they arent ready for that yet. A carrier task force is great for a blockade but hardly a sign you are ready to go to war with a group of nations that occupy half of South America.

Anonymous said...

Olefin here

Was re-reading the update and finally caught the unleash hell part of the update. Maybe they can get Russell Crowe to play Gustov in the SW movie one day.